TV | Freeview Flicks of the week – Reservoir Dogs, Big Fish and The Social Network

TV | Freeview Flicks of the week – Reservoir Dogs, Big Fish and The Social Network

Our weekly LSi best freeview flicks picks are here! This week we argue over who has to be Mr. Pink, get extremely drunk and witness the birth of Facebook.

MONDAY – Black Narcissus (More4 11:25)

Directors Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger are responsible for some of the most important films made in Britain in the 1940s and 50s. Under the name ‘The Archers’ they directed everything from The Red Shoes to A Matter of Life and Death. Their 1947 film Black Narcissus is less well known but just as good. Telling the story of five nuns who open a convent in the Himalayas, it is a fine film full of great performances which you can enjoy several times due to the numerous layers and depths.

TUESDAY – Reservoir Dogs (Five USA 22:00)

Hate him or love him, Quentin Tarantino is one of the most popular directors in modern cinematic history. His first feature length directorial debut, Reservoir Dogs in 1992, is arguably his best with its highly original story, quirky humour and brilliant character portrayed wonderfully. Opening with a scene that discusses the ‘true’ meaning of Madonna’s ‘Like A Virgin’, you know you are in with a treat. Oozing with style and talent it is unforgettable, especially the scene that plays to Stealers Wheels ‘Stuck in the Middle with You’.

WEDNESDAY – Big Fish (Film4 18:35)

Based on the novel by Daniel Wallace, Big Fish is a favourite for many Tim Burton fans. Telling the story of a son trying to learn as much as possible about his dying father through reliving the stories he told, it has a big heart and a fantastic sense of adventure that makes it utterly enjoyable. The fantasy scenes are beautifully creative and imaginative and could only have come from Burton’s wonderful mind. Ewan McGregor gives a fantastic central performance as a young Ed Bloom.

THURSDAY – Senna (ITV4 22:30)

Documentaries are hard to get right, but in 2011 Asif Kapadia hit the nail on the head with award-winning Senna. Following the life of Formula One driver Aryton Senna it is thrilling, funny, emotional, tragic, enjoyable, fascinating and just a fabulous watch from start to finish. Even if you have no idea who Senna is and have no interest in Formula One do watch this film as it proves just how powerful documentaries can be.

FRIDAY – Withnail & I (Channel 4 00:30)

Although Bruce Robinson hasn’t had the greatest impact in cinema, (his last film was the awful The Rum Diary), his directorial debut Withnail & I will always have legendary status and deservedly so. Set in London 1969 Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann play two washed-up unemployed men who decide to go on a holiday to the countryside. Hilarity, of course, ensues with classic dialogue you will be repeating to your friends days after. Whatever you do though do not watch the film whilst playing the well-known drinking game.

SATURDAY – District 9 (Film4 22:55)

Neill Blomkamp’s recent directorial effort Elysium may have been a complete disappointment, however his film District 9 is the opposite as a tremendous triumph that rbought something new to the world of science-fiction. Combing sci-fi with politics, this film is a unique tale that looks at a future world where aliens are forced to live in slums separate from the humans on Earth. Sharlto Copley is breath-taking in the lead role and this tragic but action-packed story will give you food for though.

SUNDAY – The Social Network (Channel 4 22:00)

Even though the subject matter may seem a little dry, the birth of Facebook, in the hands of director David Fincher and writer Aaron Sorkin the story is transformed into a dramatic tale of betrayal, ruined friendships and the abuse of power. The dialogue and script from the start is very quick and smart, it is Sorkin’s writing of course, but it makes for a fast and witty telling of the story. Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield and even Justin Timberlake give brilliant performances throughout the movie making each character stand out.

Emily Murray

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