Features | Top 10 moving out tips

Features | Top 10 moving out tips

Every summer, thousands of students move between properties or away from Leeds. Towards the end of June, as demand for bin bags and cardboard boxes soar, and as landlords become increasingly difficult to get hold of, moving house can be a busy and stressful time. The exodus of students from properties throughout Leeds can cause gridlocked roads, rubbish on the streets, and more than one unhappy neighbour. These are just a few of the things you might want to think about when moving in and out of your house in Leeds.

 

Got any unwanted, reusable items?

This year the Leave Leeds Tidy project is working in partnership with local charities St. Vincent’s and Emmaus to host Collection Days in Hyde Park and Headingley. Here you can drop off any reusable items that you don’t want, such as pots and pans, crockery, stationary, bedding, clothes, electrical goods, and tinned or non-perishable food. Find out when and where your collection points will be here.

 

Freezer stuffed with food?

Unfortunately charities can’t accept unwanted frozen food, so try to eat everything you can’t keep before you move out. If you’re defeated by this task, why not offer anything leftover to a neighbour?

 

Re-check your move-in inventory

Some landlords provide an inventory noting the condition of the property and what’s included. It’s important to check yours (if you have one), and arrange a final inspection with your landlord. Make sure you take photos of the property and final meter readings before you leave (even if bills were included).  If bills weren’t included, check if your landlord requires proof that you’ve paid the bills.

 

Sofas don’t fit in bins…

 Got some really bulky waste that’s not reusable? Can’t remove it yourself? You can give the council a ring on 0113 2224406 and they’ll come and take it away for you, free of charge.

 

Shred important documents!

Identity thieves may look through your bins and use your name, address or personal details to steal your identity. Use the shredders in the Leeds University Union foyer by the helpdesk to prevent this fraud.

 

A few empty bottles in your garden or piled up in your kitchen?

Why not take a trip to your local bottle bank? Check here to find out the location of your nearest one. You can also give the council a ring on 0789127726 to report a full or overflowing bottle bank and it will be emptied within 24 hours.

 

Keep your deposit safe!

Contact your landlord if you don’t hear about your deposit within two to four weeks. If you still don’t get a response or have a dispute, contact your deposit protection scheme within their three month deadline. When you move into a new property, make sure your new landlord tells you which Tenancy Deposit Protection Scheme they’re using (this is a legal requirement).

 

Damage in the new property?

E-mail your landlord if there are problems or missing items, and take photos of any damage to the property.  If an inventory is not provided, make your own and get an independent witness to sign it.

 

Need to part with some clothes?

Clothes, bags, shoes, belts and any unwanted wearable clothes can be donated to the Love Leeds Charity Shop based on Level -1 of the Union building. Textiles can also be recycled in textile banks all over Leeds, and at the public recycling point outside Leeds University Union. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and moving out can also be a good time to make some cash selling stuff you no longer want. Why not set up an eBay shop or advertise your stuff for sale on Facebook or Twitter?

 

Want more advice?

Look out for the Leave Leeds Tidy Champions who will be out on the streets between 13th May and 1st July, equipped with advice and information for residents. Alternatively you can check out the Leave Leeds Tidy website, tweet @LeaveLeedsTidy or pop into LUU’s Student Advice Centre for more help with moving house or deposit issues. The Student Advice Centre is open all summer and can provide help by telephone or email if you aren’t in Leeds.

 

Rosie Collington

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