Review: The Three Kings – a more cynical christmas

Review: The Three Kings – a more cynical christmas

Part of me is cynical about Christmas, part of me wants to cut strings of paper snowflakes. “The Three Kings” hits somewhere between these contrasting mindsets, and this theatrical farce is something we need more of at the end of 2016. The story follows the three wise-ish men on their journey to Jerusalem and portrays a different side of the Christmas story we all know backwards.

‘Each of the Kings were well crafted, providing optimism, cynicism, strength or comic relief where needed.’

Each of the Kings were well crafted, providing optimism, cynicism, strength or comic relief where needed. Casper, Balthazar and Melchior were wonderfully distinct characters, each possessing different elements of wisdom that filled the gaps in the others’ expertise. Casper was a great mix of characters, being almost a cross between Albus Dumbledore and that loveable grandparent who is always offering you biscuits. The brothers Balthazar and Melchior made the love between siblings obvious, that sibling love which allows you to swear at and insult each other, but then fight against the world when they’re threatened. Their insightful opening of the second act contained most of the emotion of the night, a bit more of that could have enhanced the experience further.

‘Casper was a great mix of characters, being almost a cross between Albus Dumbledore and that loveable grandparent who is always offering you biscuits.’

In some moments the characters’ development felt rushed, Herod’s madness stood out here, but the audience seemed to bond with each character, even the donkey. Everyone held their collective breaths with each new plot twist, and laughed effortlessly at the well thought out little details which were scattered throughout the play. The simple set transformed seamlessly and the variety of music was well considered. Although the mix of costume styles and eras was hard to accept at first, it was easy to let go and enjoy the show. Blending cynicism with magic is hard, but for me, Ashmore and Price did it well.

Channah Parker

(Image courtesy of The Three Kings)

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