Shock as students realise posting photos of revision on social media has no effect on overall exam grade

Shock as students realise posting photos of revision on social media has no effect on overall exam grade

As exam season ends and results are released, Leeds students are finding themselves shocked and upset as their grades fall short of their expectations. A whopping majority of the student body has found itself surprised, angry, and confused that their most ruthlessly deployed revision tactic has failed them in their hour of need.

“I posted like, one Snapchat a day,” says one disgruntled student, who wishes to remain anonymous. “And the odd Instagram story for good measure. And I still got a 2:2. It was weird, because like, it looked and felt like I had my life together, but maybe I didn’t?”

Following extensive research, it has become clear that most students believed posting pictures of themselves revising on social media outlets would help boost their grades. Photos posted included generic snaps of the library as well as edgier photos of various items of stationery. “I’d spend ages arranging the shot,” explained another student. “I’d artfully spread my books out to make it look like I’d done shit tons of reading, get a little snap of my notes, and then even get my laptop into the frame. It was literally genius.” This student chose to refrain from telling us her eventual grade.

With cleverly placed geotags of various campus libraries and carefully chosen filters, it’s no wonder students are raging. “I honestly spent 80, maybe 90 percent of time creating and posting these masterpieces. And now I’ve got fuck all to show for it – apart from a few Snapchat memories. The other 10% of my time was spent reading books, and now it’s got me thinking – what if I invested more time in that instead? That’d be quite a radical tactic, but after seeing my results, I’m thinking I need a radical change in my work ethic.”

This suggestion sounds ground-breaking, we are The Pigeon sincerely hope it works.

We’ll keep you posted as research in this area progresses.

Serena Smith