You Me At Six Rock the O2 Academy, 21.11.18

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The amount of people waiting in the queue even after the first support band started to play anticipated a good show for the 21st of November’s evening. Outside it was freezing cold, but the inside of the O2 Academy was warm as the crowd awaited for You Me at Six to perform.

The Scottish alt-rock band The XCERTS kick-started the gig with their clean but strong music, in which you can easily find some clear reminiscence to You Me at Six. The strong drums built up a good atmosphere, which was certainly affected by the lack of energy on stage while playing. Overall, it was an enjoyable performance to heat up for the big act.

All of the movement which The XCERTS lacked was channelled by Marmozets’ lead singer, Rebecca Macintyre. She managed to deliver an excellent rock show while provocatively dancing to its band most known tunes, such as ‘Why Do You Hate Me?’. The contrast between both support bands was striking, as Marmozets much more hard-core sound filled the room with its distorted guitar and high-pitch singing. However, this guitar made it difficult to hear Macintyre’s singing, which sometimes completely faded away. The act was well received by the audience, as you would expect from a West Yorkshire band.

From the very moment You Me at Six came into the scenario, the crowd went wild. As if they were dragged away by Josh Franceschi’s energy, the atmosphere was drastically affected by his charisma and vitality. Without a shadow of doubt, he is a powerful performer who has a notorious influence in the crowds he manages to unite. Throughout the gig, he interacted in several ways with the audience, talking to it and expressing his gratitude.

However, this same attitude also made the concert considerably less enjoyable for part of the crowd. Not only was he visibly happy whenever the people at the centre of the crowd started jumping and pushing around in a very aggressive way, but he also actively encouraged this dangerous practices. Mosh pits are an essential part of rock concerts, but there are limits that should not be trespassed on behalf of everyone’s safety. Personally, I’m perfectly okay with a rational amount of pushing and moshing at a rock concert, but seeing people fall to the floor is a sign that things are getting out of control. When I saw the concert briefly stop due to security having to remove a crying young girl and her older brother, I knew the quality of the gig was being affected by the audience’s attitude.

As a 10th anniversary of their debut album, Take Off Your Colours, many of the most well-known songs by the band were played and the sing-along of the crowd was constant. It was visibly obvious during the whole duration of the show that both You Me at Six and the audience where enjoying themselves while time-travelling through best-known hits such as ‘Bite My Tongue’, ‘Underdog’ and ‘Always attract’. A very enjoyable way to spend a weekday evening with a band which, overall, has a brilliant live sound.

Elena Sotelo 

Header Image Credit: Rock Sound Tv